Solidarity Statement in Support of Latrice Booker

We as members of Indiana Black Librarians Network (IBLN), stand in full support of Latrice Booker and her resignation letter as Indiana Library Federation (ILF) president, that exposed white supremacy and anti-Black racism within our library profession and professional organizations like the ILF. We know a few things to be true, the libraries where we work can be hostile to Black and other marginalized people, whether they are patrons or library staff. Black library staff see the importance in the work that we do to help serve the informational needs of the people in our communities; the ability to do our jobs more effectively would increase if we did not have to navigate toxic work environments or toxic situations with our colleagues and those in power at our institutions.

This year the Indiana Black Librarians Network will celebrate 20 years as an organization. We stand as an organization that provides a place of support, learning, mentorship and information exchange for Black librarians and our allies. We encourage anyone who wants to learn the richness of our Black librarians working in the state of Indiana to follow and support IBLN through membership, donations and attending our programs. We know that much change is needed to make our profession live up to the myth that librarianship is the cornerstone of democracy. We can only move in that direction if we acknowledge our white supremacist past and its lasting effects. That we call on white librarians to do their part in dismantling white supremacy in our profession and our professional organizations.

Here are our demands for ILF: 

  1. There needs to be a strategic effort to hire and retain Black librarians in the state of Indiana.
  1. Intentional outreach to diverse librarians with ILF in leadership and programming. They can work with IBLN members to increase their diverse programming and outreach that amplify the voices and concerns of Black librarians in the state of Indiana. 
  1. Set up a scholarship program supporting diverse populations. We need to eliminate the monetary barrier for Black librarians to enter into the profession. 
  1. Anti-racism training for ILF leadership and members. This will help Black librarians and other librarians of color feel more comfortable working with ILF leadership and its members moving forward.

These demands are not meant to be easy. These demands are not meant to absolve the harm that has been done. These demands are to create a new path forward that breaks the cycle of white supremacy in our profession so that we all can thrive.

Find more information about IBLN at our website: http://indianablacklibrarians.net

Follow us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/INBLN

Call For Papers

Call for Papers

Library History and Library Historians During COVID-19: Reports from the Field

Libraries: Culture, History, and Society (https://www.psupress.org/Journals/jnls_LCHS.html) and LHRT News and Notes (https://lhrtnews.wordpress.com/) unite and provide writing opportunities for a global community of scholars, practitioners, students, and retirees interested in library history. As we all near the one-year anniversary of remote teaching, service disruption, and quarantine brought on by COVID-19, the editors invite your reflections on how the pandemic has affected our discipline and how it has changed members of the library history community as human beings. For the Fall 2021 (volume 5, number 2) issue of LCHS, and for the 2021 cycle of News and Notes, we will publish brief, personal essays from our readers describing and reflecting upon their experiences of the past year. 

Essays should be 500-3,000 words (roughly 2-7 pages, 12-point font, double-spaced) and written in the first-person point of view. Citations/endnotes are not required unless there are quotations. Please send your submission by Friday, April 20th, 2021 to LCHS@press.psu.edu . All submissions will be editorially reviewed. Up to six essays will be selected for publication in LCHS; others may be forwarded to News and Notes.

While COVID-19 has touched virtually everyone, it has done so in very different ways. Many of us are still living through the pandemic. Some have made sense of everything we’ve seen, heard, done, or felt; others have not. Thus the editors welcome submissions that describe positive, negative, mixed, and ongoing experiences. Essays may take either professional or personal points of view (or both) and may be certain or uncertain in their conclusions. Possible topics include, but are not limited to: 

*How the pandemic has affected your research plans

*Use of digitized collections for library history research

*New projects or lines of research prompted by the pandemic

*Challenges and opportunities of professional networking

*Using archives and rare materials during quarantine

*Efforts to document closures, curbside service, and libraries’ other historic experiences 

*Personal challenges, such as social isolation or work-life balance

*Gender, race, class, and other perspectives on being a historian, researcher, or librarian during COVID 

*Pandemic-related stories that point to larger truths

*Lessons learned and insights gained from the pandemic

*Post-COVID plans and hopes

For questions, please contact the LCHS editors, Bernadette A. Lear (BAL19@psu.edu) and Eric C. Novotny (ECN1@psu.edu), or News and Notes editor Brett Spencer (DBS21@psu.edu). 

Looking forward to your submissions!

Bernadette A. Lear (she/her/hers/Ms.)

Behavioral Sciences and Education Librarian

Co-Editor of Libraries: Culture, History, and Society

Penn State Harrisburg Library

351 Olmsted Dr., Middletown, PA 17057

BAL19@psu.edu – 717-948-6360

https://orcid.org/0000-0001-9576-0704
http://www.psupress.org/Journals/jnls_LCHS.html

Libraries, Leadership and Social Justice – Free Webinar

The UC Davis Libraries and the Librarians Association of the University of California, Davis Chapter is hosting a special Zoom talk by Dr. Renate Chancellor – Libraries, Leadership and Social Justice: Lessons from E.J. Josey – on Wednesday, February 10, at 1:00pm PT (details below). 

The event is free and open to all library professionals. Registration [https://ucdavis.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJcqcuqqqzgqEtO2xOGLaaGsTd0Xs-gD18KN] is required to receive the link to join. We look forward to seeing you there!

LIBRARIES, LEADERSHIP AND SOCIAL JUSTICE: Lessons from E.J. Josey

Librarian, educator and activist E.J. Josey stands out within the broader social and political landscape of civil rights for his courage and leadership in desegregating the library profession. As president of the American Library Association (ALA) from 1984 to 1985, he successfully drafted a resolution preventing state library associations from discriminating against librarians of color — an act considered by many to have desegregated the ALA.

During this online talk, Dr. Renate Chancellor, author of E. J. Josey: Transformational Leader of the Modern Library Profession (2020), will seek to answer the following questions: How did Josey transform the modern profession? What lessons can we take from his leadership and apply today?

Renate Chancellor is Chair and Associate Professor in the Department of Library and Information Science at the Catholic University of America. She received her Master’s and Ph.D. in Information Studies from UCLA. Dr. Chancellor’s research focuses on human information behavior, organizational leadership, social justice in library and information science, and library education at historically black colleges and universities. She has published in scholarly journals and presented her research in national and international venues. Recent publications include: E.J. Josey: Transformational Leader in the Modern Library Profession; Racial Battle Fatigue: The Unspoken Burden of Black Women Faculty In LIS; Struggling to Breathe: COVID-19, protest and the LIS response; and Libraries on the Frontlines: Neutrality and Social Justice. She is a recipient of the Association for Library and Information Science Education (ALISE) Leadership Award and the ALISE Excellence in Teaching Award.

ALA IRRT Webinar

September 30 Webinar: Accessing African Children’s Literature Through Online Resources

 Come learn from our two panelists, experts in juvenile literature from Africa.

The International Relations Committee and Africa Subcommittee is pleased to present a webinar on September 30, 2020:

Accessing African Children’s Literature through Online Resources

Please share with colleagues and other groups.

All are welcome!

https://ala-events.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_IUAOqRcTT7qkgpjql62X5Q

September 30, 2020  

Time Zones: 6:00 pm Nairobi

11:00 am Eastern Time (USA)

10:00 am Central Time (USA)

9:00 am Mountain (USA)

8:00 am Pacific (USA)

Call for Papers: Cultural Heritage Institutions in Popular Culture

CULTURAL HERITAGE INSTITUTIONS IN POPULAR CULTURE 

Southwest Popular / American Culture Association (SWPACA) 

42nd Annual Conference, Week of February 22-27, 2021 

http://www.southwestpca.org

Submissions Open September 1, 2020 

Submission Deadline: November 13, 2020 

For the 2021 Conference, SWPACA is going virtual! Due to concerns regarding COVID-19, we will be holding our annual conference completely online this year. We hope you will join us for exciting papers, discussions, and the experience you’ve come to expect from Southwest. 

Proposals for papers and panels are now being accepted for the 42nd annual SWPACA conference. One of the nation’s largest interdisciplinary academic conferences, SWPACA offers nearly 70 subject areas, each typically featuring multiple panels. For a full list of subject areas, area descriptions, and Area Chairs, please visit http://southwestpca.org/conference/call-for-papers/ 

Suggested topics include, but are not limited to: 

•           Histories and profiles of popular culture resources and collections in cultural heritage institutions; a chance to show off what you’ve got to scholars who might want to use it 

•           Intellectual freedom or cultural sensitivity issues related to popular culture resources 

•           Book clubs and reading groups, city- or campus-wide reading programs 

•           Special exhibits of popular culture resources, outreach programs, etc. of cultural heritage institutions 

•           Collection and organization of popular culture resources; marketing and ethical issues 

•           Web 2.0, gaming, semantic web, etc. and their impact on libraries, archives, museums, and digital humanities collections 

•           The role of public libraries, archives, museums, and other cultural heritage institutions in economic hard times and natural disasters 

•           Oral history projects 

•           Digital humanities and other digital/data-based projects on popular culture, the Southwest, and other relevant subjects, both those based in cultural heritage institutions and those in academia or other organizations. 

We encourage proposals for panels and roundtables organized around common themes. 

All proposals must be submitted through the conference’s database at http://register.southwestpca.org/southwestpca 

For details on using the submission database and on the application process in general, please see the Proposal Submission FAQs and Tips page at http://southwestpca.org/conference/faqs-and-tips/ 

Individual proposals for 15-minute papers must include an abstract of approximately 200-500 words. For information on how to submit a proposal for a roundtable or a multi-paper panel, please view the above FAQs and Tips page.    

SWPACA will offer registration reimbursement awards for the best graduate student papers in a variety of categories. Submissions of accepted, full papers are due January 1, 2021. SWPACA will also offer registration reimbursement awards for select undergraduate and graduate students in place of our traditional travel awards. For more information, visit http://southwestpca.org/conference/graduate-student-awards/. Registration for the conference will be open and available in late fall. Watch your email for details! 

In addition, please check out the organization’s peer-reviewed, scholarly journal, Dialogue: The Interdisciplinary Journal of Popular Culture and Pedagogy, at http://journaldialogue.org/ 

If you have any questions about the Cultural Heritage Institutions in Popular Culture area, please contact its Area Chair, Dr. Suzanne Stauffer stauffer@lsu.edu.  

Webinar: An Outrage: Hosting a Virtual Scholar-Led Screening and Discussion

Join ALA’s Public Programs Office for a free webinar to learn how your library can use free resources to host a virtual event about the history and legacy of lynching in the American South.

WEBINAR: An Outrage: Hosting a Virtual Scholar-Led Screening and Discussion

Wednesday, Sept. 9

1 p.m. CT

Register here: https://programminglibrarian.org/learn/outrage-hosting-virtual-scholar-led-screening-and-discussion

The nationwide uprising for racial justice could spur fundamental shifts in how Americans remember and reckon with the past. Join us to learn how your library can play a constructive role by hosting a virtual film screening and discussion program.

In this webinar, participants will hear from the librarian who led the writing of a community discussion guide for “An Outrage,” a Smithsonian-premiered, award-winning documentary film about the history and legacy of lynching in the American South.

Participants in this session will learn how to:

  • Plan a successful screening
  • Engage with local scholars
  • Write questions that will foster open and respectful discussion

Funding for this webinar has been provided by the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) as part of Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security (CARES) Act economic stabilization plan.

Call for Papers

The African Library & Information Association & Institutions has put out a call for papers.

Currently, the Fourth Industrial revolution is building on digital technology as data and knowledge become the premium commodities for innovative solutions; as people, machines and locations become hyper-connected and lines between digital, physical and biological realities blur. So many possibilities exist with the different strands and components of 4IR as learning, teaching, research and scholarly communications have heavily migrated online due to the COVID-19 pandemic. All these undergird the theme of the 4th AfLIA Conference and 6th African Libraries Summit ‘Fourth Industrial Revolution, sustainable development and African libraries’.

Africa is facing developmental challenges in all sectors that need innovative solutions. The 4IR can only be driven with knowledge, access to information and skills that will enable Africans to learn, think and innovate. AfLIA, as the trusted platform for African librarians in the continent and the diaspora sees potentials for libraries to be integrated into national, regional and industrial thrusts for 4IR initiatives in the continent. We are therefore highly interested in getting all Library professionals ready for the 4IR; ready for the future that is already here.

The 2021 AfLIA Conference and 6th African Libraries Summit will offer librarians the opportunities to learn more about 4IR, update their skills and understand their roles as African countries work on Smart City ideas, Connectivity, Open Science and Machine Learning among other features of 4IR. This 4th AfLIA Conference and 6th African Library Summit will include preconference workshops, Keynote and paper presentations from experts, posters, Ignite Talks as well as sessions by AfLIA Sections and entities in the industry who may wish to participate.  AfLIA is also introducing the Big Ideas Podium for innovative and creative thinkers in the profession who can stir others up through spoken word artistry and help the African Library sector see the future of libraries in the continent properly as pertains to the 4IR.

Please visit https://web.aflia.net/call-for-papers-4th-aflia-conference-and-6th-african-library-summit/ for more information.

ALSC Virtual Conference – Multiple Scholarships Available – Deadline 9/9!

There are 13 scholarships available for public library staff to apply for the 2020 Association for Library Service to Children (ALSC) Virtual National Institute [ala.org] which will take place online between October 2-3.  Due to COVID-19 and the conference moving online, we’re able to offer more scholarships than normal due to the lower cost involved.  The details for the scholarships are as follows:

Number of Scholarships:  20 minimum

Deadline:  September 9th by end of day (recipients will be notified on 9.11)

Application Link:  ALSC Scholarship [surveymonkey.com]

If awarded a scholarship, conference attendees will be expected to participate in a “Teach Back [docs.google.com]” as a way to share the knowledge they gained with the wider Virginia library world.

For more information regarding scholarships from the Library of Virginia, please see our Scholarships [vpl.virginia.gov] page on the InfoCenter.  If you have any questions, please let me know.  Thanks and have a wonderful rest of your day!

Reagen

Free Live-Virtual Discussion

National Underground Railroad Freedom Center

Topic: Unmasking the Realities: Racial Equity in Education on Thursday, August 27, 2020 | 6:00 pm – 7:30 pm

Racial equity is corrective justice for communities that have suffered oppression due to a long history of legislated or institutionalized racism. Many people may not realize there is an equity problem in education because their individual experiences or biases don’t allow them to see inequity. Yet there are visible disparities in student outcomes, teacher performance, curriculum, admission practices and more linked to race.

Join us for a candid conversation with parents and educators about the impact of COVID-19 on an education system that already faces a pre-existing struggle with racial equity. Panelists include:

Dr. Littisha Bates, Parent, Associate Dean, Teacher, Researcher and Activist, University of Cincinnati

Shadiyah Cammack, Teacher, Chicago, IL

Yolanda Lauderdale, Parent, Teacher, Cincinnati Public Schools

Whitney Owens, Parent, Chief Learning Officer, Cincinnati Museum Center

Monise Seward, Parent, Teacher, Atlanta, GA

Register

https://zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_sfnIxm54Rd6JQJAqxUCeMQ